349. (Jim Powell)

If readers come across Jim Powell, it is most likely to be in his translation of Sappho—his only work in…

348. (Charles Baudelaire)

How long does it take to absorb an influence, to learn what the insights of another mean? A couple of…

347. (William Carlos Williams)

William Carlos Williams, whose poetry I’ve long felt to be, in hazy terms, slack and arbitrary, claiming, by its effusion,…

346. (W.B. Yeats)

The early Yeats, the earliest aesthete, late pre-Raphaelite Yeats, the world is presented as a tumult of passion, fading into…

345. (Wallace Stevens)

William Empson on the foundation of humanism: “the world is good enough for me; let me be good enough for…

344. (Robert Lowell)

Robert Lowell is a genius of scale, disproportion, and incongruity; from the earliest poetry, the most intensely Catholic, he developed…

343. (John Donne)

The last line of “A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning” riddles, urging us to return to the start of the poem, as…

342. (Aristotle)

The word “Virtue” can smack of the pious or sentimental, smoked with the incense of sentimentality. I think, though, that…

341. (Henry Wadsworth Longfellow)

The Fire of Drift-wood DEVEREUX FARM, NEAR MARBLEHEAD. We sat within the farm-house old,       Whose windows, looking o’er the bay,…

340. (Robert Browning)

It’s true enough that Robert Browning’s enduring preoccupation was the perpetual fracturing of truth. But that preoccupation persists through poetry…