355. (Robert Lowell)

“My Last Afternoon with Uncle Devereux Winslow” has become one of my favorite poems by Robert Lowell and one that…

354. (Søren Kierkegaard)

Wittgenstein praised Kierkegaard, but remarked also that a little of Kierkegaard goes a long way. For Wittgenstein, perhaps. But for…

353. (William Shakespeare)

This is a post on Shakespeare’s sonnets, read narrowly through Empson’s analysis in Some Versions of Pastoral. A friend of…

352. (William Empson)

            Aristotle, frustrating some, claims that “a life of virtue is a life of flourishing.” The statement can be variously…

351. (Sonia Sanchez)

One divide in post-1950, maybe post-1960, American poetry could be said to grow out of the claims of the eye.…

350. (Paule Marshall)

Paule Marshall’s debut novel, Brown Girl, Brownstones is one of the best American novels of the mid-twentieth century. When Marshall…

349. (Jim Powell)

If readers come across Jim Powell, it is most likely to be in his translation of Sappho—his only work in…

348. (Charles Baudelaire)

How long does it take to absorb an influence, to learn what the insights of another mean? A couple of…

347. (William Carlos Williams)

William Carlos Williams, whose poetry I’ve long felt to be, in hazy terms, slack and arbitrary, claiming, by its effusion,…

346. (W.B. Yeats)

The early Yeats, the earliest aesthete, late pre-Raphaelite Yeats, the world is presented as a tumult of passion, fading into…