328. (John Donne)

Donne’s poetry does not achieve ambiguities at the cost of compression; it achieves compression with the success of ambiguities. That … More

327. (William Blake)

A source of strength for William Blake’s sensitivity towards freedom, and all that it can mean and be, is a … More

326. (Percy Bysshe Shelley)

The sublime is central to Shelley, and Shelley’s relationship to the sublime makes him central to modern poetry, as no … More

325. (Yves Bonnefoy)

On first reading the collection, I found Yves Bonnefoy’s The Beginning and End of Snow  to be one of the … More

324. (William Gaddis)

Near the end of The Recognitions we are told that Stanley dedicates his composition to the souls of three women. … More

323. (William Gaddis)

Giving a speech years after the novel was published, William Gaddis recalled feeling momentary surprise, followed by understanding, when a … More

322. (William Gaddis)

My initial reaction to The Recognitions, on my second reading of the novel, was captured in the post I wrote … More

321. (William Empson)

William Empson’s brilliance as a reader is more immediate than his brilliance as a critic. The line between the two … More

320. (William Gaddis)

Re-reading William Gaddis’ The Recognitions, I come closer to understanding what Empson meant when he bucked against the post-Eliot neo-Christian … More

319. (Anton Chekhov)

On “Ward No. 6” This post belongs mostly to a good friend of mine, whose specializing in Victorian literature enriches … More