369. (William Shakespeare)

Identity, though it dances to many tunes, stands on two legs: commitment and recognition. In the recent work on Shakespeare…

368. (William Shakespeare)

“How ‘blow’? How ‘blow’? Speak to be understood”—demands The Princess to Boyet in the final act of Love’s Labour’s Lost.…

367. (Giacomo Leopardi)

Leopardi’s “La Sera Del Di Festa” (“The Evening of the Holiday” (that translations not one to which I will refer,…

366. (John Milton)

In a work of literature, rightness of feeling coincides with a feeling of rightness; authors apprehend just what and how…

365. (Stevie Smith)

In my last post on Stevie Smith, I suggested that the poet writes from a perspective of innocence, translating into…

364. (Stevie Smith)

It might be tempting to think Stevie Smith is putting on an act; with such a thought, we might be…

363. (Robert Duncan)

A Poem of Despondencies . We go whatever route to run un-      obstructed. A city without seasons may bug…

362. (T.S. Eliot)

The problem of criticism—and the study of criticism—is what to say about, how to reflect on and make sense of,…

361. (Geoffrey Hill)

Poem 154 of The Book of Baruch by the Gnostic Justin: . Cinquefoil apple-flowers touch down in grass; early roses…

360. (William Shakespeare)

In Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night, the good great houses of Orsino and Olivia insist upon decorum and the traditions of civilization;…